Don’t Forget Your Little Ones! National Infant Immunization Week is April 20 – April 27

Dalton, (GA) – National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) is April 20 - 27, 2013. The North Georgia Health District (NGHD), part of the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH), urges residents in Cherokee, Fannin, Gilmer, Murray, Pickens and Whitfield Counties to remember their little ones by speaking with a healthcare provider or doctor to make sure their babies are up-to-date on their vaccinations.

“Young children need champions in their lives to keep them protected,” said Marie Smith, district immunization and child health coordinator. “Parents think of car seats, safety locks, baby gates and external ways to keep our babies safe, but forget that one of the best ways to protect our children is to make sure they have all of their vaccinations.”

Originally recognized in 1994, NIIW provides an invaluable opportunity for our community to remind people how important it is for children to be vaccinated. It is a call to action for parents, caregivers and healthcare providers to ensure that infants are fully vaccinated against 14 vaccine-preventable diseases.

 

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

*Two doses given at least four weeks apart are recommended for children aged 6 months through 8 years of age who are getting a flu vaccine for the first time and for some other children in this age group.

§Two doses of HepA vaccine are needed for lasting protection. The first dose of HepA vaccine should be given between 12 months and 23 months of age. The second dose should be given 6 to 18 months later. HepA vaccination may be given to any child 12 months and older to protect against HepA. Children and adolescents, who did not receive the HepA vaccine and are at high risk, should be vaccinated against HepA. 

Read more ...

Get Yourself Tested! It's STD Awareness Month

April is STD Awareness Month, a time to get yourself tested for STDs (sexually transmitted diseases), and it's time for people both young and old to understand the importance of getting tested.

Some of the most common STDs are chlamydia, herpes and gonorrhoea.  Around 3 million new cases of chlamydia are  reported each year, with adolescent women being the most commonly affected.

But STDs like chlamydia are passed through unprotected sex, and can often be prevented by using condoms.    

While chlamydia can be treated with the use of antibiotics, STDs like HIV/AIDS are for life and will require continual treatment.  

It is thought 1 in 5 Americans living with HIV don’t know they have it, and that’s why it’s so important to know early HIV symptoms and get tested.

At the STD Awareness Month website there is a whole host of resources to provide clinics with posters and leaflets that will give patients all the information they need, from ongoing HIV research to the benefits of condoms.

And at the It's your sex life website you can find out everything you need to know about STDs, condoms and the dangers of unprotected sex.

Both websites will give you the facts and clear up any questions you might have. But of course, there is no better time to visit your healthcare provider or local health department and get yourself tested, so get checked today.  Why not go to the link below and find out by entering your ZIP code where you can access your nearest HIV or STD testing locations? Log on today to http://www.national-awareness-days.com/std-awareness-month.html!

EMPOWERING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

National Public Health Week's theme for Friday is Empowering A Healthy Community. It's impossible to disconnect our individual health from our community's health. When it comes to good health, a rising tide lifts all boats. And public health systems work to carefully monitor that tide, pinpointing choppy waters and struggling vessels and taking action to ensure that all boats have an opportunity to sail smoothly to healthier destinations.

Resilient, well-supported public health systems are critical to our nation's health and future. They maintain the health victories we've accomplished so far, such as dramatic reductions in tobacco use, and are essential to confronting today's big problems, such as rising chronic disease rates. We also need public health to monitor and protect us from emerging health threats, keep vaccine-preventable diseases at bay, provide life-saving services for vulnerable populations and so much more.

Just as important, we need public health's unique ability to rally communities around the many social determinants that shape people's health. The future of health is empowering communities with the tools, knowledge, resources and opportunities to make lasting change. Learn more at http://www.nphw.org/tools-and-tips/themes/empowering-a-healthy-community. 

Protecting You While You’re on the Move

Thursday's theme for National Public Health Week is Protecting You While You're On The Move, because public health never stays in just one place. It stays with you while you're on the move, keeping you safe no matter your mode of transportation. Public health — one could say — is the perfect traveling companion.

In fact, the simple act of using a seat belt may be one of the most recognizable public health victories: From 1981 to 2010, seat belt use rose from 11 percent to about 85 percent, saving hundreds of thousands of lives. Nowadays, it just seems strange to see someone not buckle up. But the job's not done. Drivers, passengers, pedestrians and bicyclists still face preventable dangers on the road. Plus, a new national movement is quickly gaining momentum to design our communities with safe walking, biking and physical activity opportunities in mind. Let's move forward together. Learn more about staying healthy and safe while on the move at http://www.nphw.org/tools-and-tips/themes/protecting-you-while-youre-on-the-move.

travel-safe

scores
Career Center
North Georgia WIC   DPH CDC