Flu Shots TO GO at DRIVE-BY FLU SHOT CLINIC in Jasper, Sept 27

Pickens Drive by Flu Shot Clinic Web Post 2017Fast, safe, convenient... get your flu shot to go at the DRIVE-BY FLU SHOT CLINIC in Jasper! Just roll in, roll up a sleeve and get the shot that will protect you all flu season. The Pickens County Health Department will conduct their annual Drive-by Flu Shot Clinic on Wednesday, September 27th from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm at Mt. Zion Baptist Church at 1036 North Main Street. You’ll also be helping public health staff and community partners practice local Point of Dispensing operations for times of emergency. 4-in-1 Quadrivalent Flu Shots will be $25 and Fluzone High Dose Flu Shots for people 65 and older will be $65. Cash, checks, credit cards, Medicare, Medicaid, Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cigna, Coventry, Humana and United Healthcare Insurance will be accepted. The CDC recommends getting a flu shot each year. The fastest, most convenient way to get that shot is at the Drive-by Flu Shot Clinic in Jasper! Call (706) 253-2821 for more information.

Flu Shots TO GO at DRIVE-BY FLU SHOT CLINIC in Woodstock, Sept 26

Cherokee DRIVE BY Flu Shot Clinic Web imageFast, safe, convenient... get your flu shot to go at the DRIVE-BY FLU SHOT CLINIC in Woodstock! Just roll in, roll up a sleeve and get the shot that will protect you all flu season. The Cherokee County Health Department will conduct their annual Drive-by Flu Shot Clinic on Tuesday, September 26th from 9 am to 2 pm at a new location this year: Woodstock City Church at 150 Ridgewalk Parkway. You’ll also be helping public health staff and community partners practice local Point of Dispensing operations for times of emergency. 4-in-1 Quadrivalent Flu Shots will be $25 and Fluzone High Dose Flu Shots for people 65 and older will be $65. Cash, checks, credit cards, Medicare, Medicaid, Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cigna, Coventry, Humana and United Healthcare Insurance will be accepted. The CDC recommends getting a flu shot each year. The fastest, most convenient way to get that shot is at the Drive-by Flu Shot Clinic in Woodstock! Call (770) 928-0133 or (770) 345-7371 for more information.

DPH Urges Safety Precautions After Irma

GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

NEWS RELEASE 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sept. 12, 2017​​          

Contact; Nancy Nydam​, nancy.nydam@dph.ga.gov

DPH Urges Safety Precautions After Irma

Keep Yourself and Your Loved Ones Safe By Following Basic Safety Tips

ATLANTA – Hurricane/tropical storm Irma is no longer a threat but recovering from the storm will take weeks, and even longer in some parts of the state. The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is urging Georgians to use extreme caution particularly in the next few days as residents return to their homes, power is restored and damage assessments are made. The storm may be over, but that doesn’t mean the danger is.

Be careful near damaged buildings 

• Do not return to your home until you are told it is safe to do so.
• Return during daylight hours, when it is easier to avoid hazards, particularly if the electricity is off.
• Do not enter your home if you are unsure of structural integrity.
• Leave immediately if you hear shifting or unusual noises.
• If you smell gas or suspect a leak, notify emergency authorities or the gas company immediately and leave the area.

Stay away from power lines 

• Stay clear of fallen power lines - be particularly careful of power lines that may be hidden in fallen trees and branches.
• Watch out for power lines dangling overhead.
• Report downed power lines to emergency authorities or the power company immediately.

Avoid floodwater

• Always follow warnings about flooded roads.
• Don’t drive through floodwater – it may be deeper than you think.
• Keep in mind that floodwater often carries germs. If you touch it, be sure to wash your hands with soap and water. If you don’t have soap or water, use alcohol-based wipes or sanitizer.

Prevent Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

• Never use a generator inside your home or garage, even if doors and windows are open. 
• Only use generators outside, more than 20 feet away from your home, doors andwindows. 
• Install battery-operated or battery backup CO detectors near every sleeping area in your home. 

Identify and throw away food that may not be safe to eat

• When in doubt, throw it out.
• Throw away food that has an unusual odor, color or texture. 
• Throw away perishable foods (including meat, poultry, fish, eggs and leftovers) in your refrigerator when the power has been off for four hours or more.
• Thawed food that contains ice crystals can be refrozen or cooked. Freezers, if left unopened and full, will keep food safe for 48 hours (24 hours if half full).
• Throw away canned foods that are bulging, opened or damaged.

Check water quality

• Listen and follow all drinking water advisories and use bottled water when in doubt.
• Do not drink water from private wells that have/may have been flooded.
• Disinfect all private wells that may have been flooded before drinking water.

Protect yourself from animals and pests

• Floods can bring mosquitoes that carry disease - use insect repellent with DEET or PicaridinIR3535, and some oil of lemon eucalyptus. Follow label directions.
• Wear long sleeves, pants and socks when you’re outside.
• Stay away from wild or stray animals after a storm - call 911 or your local public health department to report them.

Prevent mold

• Protect yourself by wearing gloves, masks and goggles. 
• Remove and discard items that cannot be washed and disinfected (such as mattresses, carpeting, carpet padding, rugs, upholstered furniture, cosmetics, stuffed animals, baby toys, pillows, foam-rubber items, books, wall coverings and paper products)within 24-48 hours.
• Remove and discard drywall and insulation that has been contaminated with sewage or floodwaters within 24-48 hours.
• Ventilate by opening all doors and windows.
• Thoroughly clean all hard surfaces (such as flooring, concrete, molding, wood and metal furniture, countertops, appliances, sinks and other plumbing fixtures) with hot water and laundry or dish detergent.

For more information go to:

https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/hurricane_irma.html

https://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/refridg_food.html

https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-05/documents/epa816f05021.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/mold/images/mold_infographic.jpg

http://www.gema.ga.gov/Pages/default.aspx

https://dph.georgia.gov/

##

About the Georgia Department of Public Health 

The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is the lead agency in preventing disease, injury and disability; promoting health and well-being; and preparing for and responding to disasters from a health perspective. For more information visit: www.dph.georgia.gov 

AVOID CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING DURING EMERGENCIES

Safety Tips from the CDC

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death if inhaled. When power outages occur during emergencies such as hurricanes or winter storms, the use of alternative sources of fuel or electricity for heating, cooling, or cooking can cause CO to build up in a home, garage, or camper and to poison the people and animals inside.

 

Every year, more than 400 people die in the U. S. from accidental CO poisoning.


Exposure to CO can cause loss of consciousness and death. The most common symptoms of CO poisoning are headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion. People who are sleeping or who have been drinking alcohol can die from CO poisoning before ever having symptoms.

 

Important CO Poisoning Prevention Tips

 

  • Never use a generator, pressure washer, or any gasoline-powered engine inside your home, basement, or garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent.

  • Never use a gas range or oven to heat a home.

  • Never leave the motor running in a vehicle parked in an enclosed or partially enclosed space, such as a garage.

  • Never run a generator, pressure washer, or any gasoline-powered engine inside a basement, garage, or other enclosed structure, even if the doors or windows are open, unless the equipment is professionally installed and vented. Keep vents and flues free of debris, especially if winds are high. Flying debris can block ventilation lines.

  • Never use a charcoal grill, hibachi, lantern, or portable camping stove inside a home, tent, or camper.

  • If conditions are too hot or too cold, seek shelter with friends or at a community shelter.

  • If CO poisoning is suspected, move to outside air, call 911 or your local Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 or consult a health care professional right away.

 

Businesses can help ensure your customers’ safety by placing important information about protecting oneself from CO poisoning in the direct vicinity of generators they are selling.

travel-safe

scores
Career Center
North Georgia WIC   DPH CDC