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  • ***IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT ABOUT APPOINTMENTS AT OUR COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH COVID-19 CLINICS***

    IF INCLEMENT WEATHER CAUSES ANY OF OUR COVID-19 VACCINE CLINICS TO DELAY OPENING OR TO CLOSE, WE WILL POST THAT INFORMATION RIGHT HERE WITH INSTRUCTIONS REGARDING APPOINTMENT RESCHEDULING. ON INCLEMENT WEATHER DAYS, PLEASE CHECK BACK HERE TO THIS **ALERTS** SECTION OF OUR WEBSITE FOR ANY UPDATES THAT MAY AFFECT YOU BEFORE GOING TO YOUR APPOINTMENT IN CHEROKEE, FANNIN, GILMER, MURRAY, PICKENS OR WHITFIELD COUNTY. THANK YOU!

     
  • For FREE COVID-19 TESTING in North Georgia, log on HERE.

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Click for CDC Diabetes Infographic in pdf

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that affects how your body turns food into energy. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant) . . . click here for information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

More than 100 million Americans are living with diabetes (30.3 million) or prediabetes (84.1 million) and many don't know it. It's important to get screened. Contact your county health department today. Click on the name of your county in the above toolbar for your county health department information.

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GestationalNovember is National Diabetes Month, and for 2018, the CDC is emphasizing diabetes that can develop during pregnancy in women who don't already have diabetes, known as Gestational Diabetes. About 50% of women with gestational diabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes, but there are steps you can take to prevent it. Talk to your doctor about how to lower your risk and how often to have your blood sugar checked to make sure you’re on track. Log on here to learn more.

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Living Well With Diabetes

senior man on bikeYou don’t get really good at dealing with diabetes overnight. But over time, you’ll figure out how to go from getting it done to taking it in stride. See if any of these tips are familiar (or worth trying!).

Remember when you first found out you had diabetes and learned the basics of taking care of yourself?

  • Make and eat healthy food.
  • Be active most days.
  • Test your blood sugar often.
  • Take medicines as prescribed, even if you feel good.
  • Learn ways to manage stress.
  • Cope with the emotional side of diabetes.
  • Go to checkups.

One way or another, you’ve had to try to make it all fit with family, work, school, holidays, and everything else in your life. Here’s our short list of tips to help – you’re probably familiar with many, but some may be new (feel free to use!). Long on here to the CDC for more information.

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