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PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE

 

Georgia Department of Public Health

State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)

Meeting April 18, 2019

Macon District Health Office

201 Second Street

Macon, Georgia 31201

9:30 am - 12 noon

 

Georgia’s Part C Program | Babies Can’t Wait (BCW)

Public Comment begins 11:00 am

 

The mission of the Georgia SICC for Early Intervention Programs is to advise the Department of Public Health and other agencies responsible for serving infants and toddlers, birth to age three with developmental delays and disabilities and their families, with an appropriate family-centered, comprehensive service delivery system which promotes optimal child development and family functioning.

 

 

VOICE YOUR OPINION!  We want to hear your thoughts, ideas, and concerns about the Babies Can’t Wait Program.  Would you like to attend the State ICC Quarterly Meeting scheduled to be held on Thursday, April 18, 2019 from 9:30am – 12:00pm? Ask your local BCW Service Coordinator about limited financial assistance available to help you with related expenses.

Public Comment 

Time is set aside for public comment during each quarterly meeting of the State Interagency Coordinating Council. If you would like to share any thoughts or ideas about Babies Can’t Wait with the Council please choose one of the options below. 

    1. Written Comment:  

Send written comments, clearly marked “PUBLIC COMMENT” to fax number 770-342-7699 or email to Phyllis Turner, SICC Coordinator, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than Wednesday, April 17, 2019. Your comments will be read aloud during the Public Comment portion of the meeting.

    1. Remote Participation:  

Pre-Register to make Public Comment via remote participation by conference line or telehealth during the meeting. (See instructions below for remote participation.) Email Phyllis Turner, SICC Coordinator, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than Public Comments Invited for Babies Can't Wait Program on April 18th..Your name will be announced to provide public comment remotely during the Public Comment portion of the meeting.

    1. In person

 

At registration sign-in on the day of the meeting checkYes” to the question, Would you like to make public comment? Your name will be announced to provide public comment during the Public Comment portion of the meeting. 

 For more information, please email Phyllis Turner, SICC Coordinator, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 REMOTE PARTICIPATION

 

For remote participation during the SICC meeting, please use one of the following options:

 

Free Conference Line

 

  • Participants can listen to the public portion of the meeting and make public comment by telephone when announced by the Council Chairperson at the time set aside for Public Comment on the meeting agenda.

  Dial (641) 552-9446, enter access code: 988041 

 

Telehealth Network

 

The Telehealth Network allows participants to view and listen to the public portion of the meeting by going to one of the following locations around the state. Participants who pre-register can make a public comment when announced by the Council Chairperson at the time allotted for Public Comment on the meeting agenda. See pre-registration instructions under Public Comment via remote participation. District Early Intervention Coordinators and Local Interagency Coordinating Council members will be given an opportunity to provide updates and information in the order listed on the meeting agenda. 

 

Northwest Health District                   

1309 Redmond Rd

Rome, Ga. 30165

Conference room 253 

VICS # 10.11.1.104.

North Georgia Health District 1-2

1710 Whitehouse Court

Building B CSN Conference Room

Dalton, GA 30720

Cobb & Douglas County Board of Health

1738 County Services Parkway

Marietta, GA 30008

Building B

WIC class room B

College Park Regional Health Center

1920 John E. Wesley Ave.,

College Park, Ga., 30337

Location Supervisor:  Janice Wright

North Central Health District

201 Second St., Room 805

Macon, GA 31201

District 4 Public Health

301 Main Street

Lagrange, GA 30240

South Health District 

206 S. Patterson St.

3rd Floor, BCW Conference Room

Valdosta, GA 31601

West Central Health District

2100 Comer Avenue

Columbus, GA 31904

Coastal Health District

420 Mall Blvd

Savannah, GA 31406

Large Conference room

Southwest Health District

1109 N. Jackson Street

Albany, GA 31701

 

North Health District

1280 Athens Street

Gainesville, GA. 30507

Large Conference Room

Southeast Health District

1123 Church Street, Annex B

Waycross, GA  31501

Richmond County Health Department

1916 North Leg Rd.  

Building B- Small training room

Augusta, Ga. 30909

South Central Health District 5-1

105 E. Jackson Street

Dublin, GA  31021

Conference Room

Northeast Health District

189 Paradise Blvd.

Athens, GA 30607

Athens District WIC Conf. Rm.

Ga Dept. of Public Health

2 Peachtree St

Atlanta, GA 30303

Room DPH 3-240 EOC Briefing Room

Clayton County Board of Health/BCW

District 3-3

1895 Phoenix Blvd.

College Park, Georgia 30349

 

 

 

 

About Babies Can’t Wait

The Babies Can’t Wait (BCW) program is Georgia’s statewide early intervention system for infants and toddlers from birth to age three with special needs and their families. BCW enhances families’ ability to meet the special needs of their child to ensure each young child with significant developmental delays reaches his or her maximum developmental potential. To learn more about DPH Babies Can’t Wait program, please call (404) 657-2850 or (888) 651-8224 or visit http://dph.georgia.gov/Babies-Cant-Wait.

 

 About the Georgia Department of Public Health

The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is the lead agency in preventing disease, injury and disability; promoting health and well-being; and preparing for and responding to disasters. DPH’s main functions include: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Maternal and Child Health, Infectious Disease and Immunization, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Emergency Medical Services, Pharmacy, Nursing, Volunteer Health Care, the Office of Health Equity, Vital Records, and the State Public Health Laboratory. For more information about DPH, visit http://dph.ga.gov.

DPH’s main functions include: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Maternal and Child Health, Infectious Disease and Immunization, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Emergency Medical Services, Pharmacy, Nursing, Volunteer Health Care, the Office of Health Equity, Vital Records, and the State Public Health Laboratory.  For more information about DPH, visit http://dph.ga.gov.

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Set your calendar for Wednesday, March 27, 2019 for the

The 14th Annual Breastfeeding Conference

featuring

Milk Mysteries with Marsha Walker

Brought to you by the Northwest Georgia Breastfeeding Coalition

 

 

Marsha Walker, RN, IBCLC

Marsha Walker, RN, IBCLC. Marsha is a registered nurse and international board certified lactation consultant. She has been assisting breastfeeding families in hospital, clinic, and home settings since 1976.  Marsha is the executive director of the National Alliance for Breastfeeding Advocacy: Research, Education, and Legal Branch (NABA REAL). As such, she advocates for breastfeeding at the state and federal levels. She served as a vice president of the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) from 1990-1994 and in 1999 as president of ILCA. She is a former board member of the Massachusetts Breastfeeding Coalition and Baby Friendly USA, ILCA’s representative to the USDA’s Breastfeeding Promotion Consortium, and NABA REAL’s representative to the US Breastfeeding Committee. Marsha is an international speaker, and an author of numerous publications including ones on the hazards of infant formula use and Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician: Using the Evidence.

Register Here button

Please note: 

Babies and Children

We welcome infants and children who need to be with their mothers. However, even happy baby noises can be distracting to attendees.  So if your baby gets any noisier than quiet baby babbling, please plan to step outside of the room. You and your baby may return as soon as your baby is quieter. Please consider sitting at the tables near the rear exit so that you can take your child out if needed. Nothing said here today is as important as meeting your baby’s needs.

children 13 for webWhen raising children, every parent could use a helping hand, but some parents are in need of special assistance with the health issues their children with special needs face. Our dedicated Child Health Services staff is committed to helping parents and their children with disabilities or serious health problems. As part of North Georgia Health District 1-2 of the Georgia Department of Public Health, we are based in Dalton and serve residents in Cherokee, Fannin, Gilmer, Murray, Pickens and Whitfield Counties. Please see our contact information down below.

Click HERE to see all the Child Health Services we offer to Children with Special Needs and to their families, or choose individual services below to review and link directly to more details:  
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
  • Children’s Medical Services supports families caring for children with special health care needs. CMS works with health care providers and community partners to make sure children and youth with chronic medical conditions have access to timely and quality health care services. Learn more about Children’s Medical Services.
 

 

 ---------- Refer a Child for a Free Health Screening ---------- 

Anyone can make a referral for any child up to age five to receive a free health or developmental screening. Click on the button below and submit a referral now!

Referral form button

Click HERE to access Guidelines for Completing the form.

Contact us for more information about Children with Special Needs services in North Georgia!

North Georgia Health District

1710 Whitehouse Court
Dalton, Georgia  30720race
Phone: (706) 529-5763IMG 2169 copy
Fax: (706) 529-5767
Collier, Holli
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

 NOW scheduling appointments and accepting new patients!

The Living Bridge Center in Dalton and The Living Bridge Center South in Canton

  

 TLBC Photo 2           TLBC South

                            The Living Bridge Center in Dalton and The Living Bridge Center South in Canton

 

Georgia has the 4th highest rate of HIV infection in the nation. The Living Bridge Center in Dalton and The Living Bridge Center South in Canton are there to help people battling HIV. The Living Bridge Centers offer full-service HIV care and treatment, HIV and STD testing, a PrEP clinic, and education and support to help people remain negative. Visit The Living Bridge Center at 1200 W. Waugh Street in Dalton or The Living Bridge Center South at 130 Riverstone Terrace, Suite 102 in Canton. Or call now to set up an enrollment appointment in Dalton at (706) 281-2360 or (470) 863-5700 in Canton. Click here to get information about HIV Prevention program in North Georgia and the services provided.

 - - - - - - - - - - -

TLBC map webThe Living Bridge Center in Dalton

To learn more about our HIV services and to make an appointment, visit The Living Bridge Center at 1200 W. Waugh Street, Dalton, GA 30720 or call (706) 281-2360, or....

 

 

 

 

  TLBC South Map

 The Living Bridge Center South in Canton

Visit The Living Bridge Center South at 130 Riverstone Terrace, Suite 102, Canton, GA 30114 or call (470) 863-5700!

 

 

  

 

Click on the above maps to get directions and online navigation to The Living Bridge Center nearest you!

- - - - - - - - - - - 

IMG 6855 Moment 4 webTLBC Open House World AIDS Day 2017 Video Thumbnail web

 

  

 

Click to watch videos of The Living Bridge Centers' Open House events! 

 

Hepatitis A Prevention in North Georgia

Web shot

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable, communicable disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). It is usually transmitted person-to-person through food or objects contaminated by fecal material. Symptoms of hepatitis A can appear abruptly and can include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, diarrhea, clay-colored stools, joint pain and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes).

Due to an increase in reported cases of hepatitis A in eastern Alabama, southeastern Tennessee and northwest Georgia, and to prevent the spread of hepatitis A, the North Georgia Health District is conducting a vaccination campaign among our populations who are at greatest risk for becoming infected with hepatitis A, including persons incarcerated in jails, homeless persons, drug users (and their family members and friends who do not use drugs but are in close contact), and men who have sex with men. We also urge food service workers to get vaccinated, as well.

North Georgia Health District county public health departments are providing the first dose of hepatitis A vaccination for *free at  Health Departments in Cherokee, FanninGilmer, Murray, Pickens or Whitfield County, especially for the above people who are at greatest risk and for food service workers. Just click on the county name where you live in North Georgia and link to that county health department web page for contact information.

*Clients will not be charged a fee  for the first dose of hepatitis A vaccine; however, if acceptable health insurance or Medicare is available, these plans will be billed. If no health coverage is available, the first vaccine will still be provided to the client at no cost. Also, a second dose is recommended 6 months later, but to vaccinate as many people as possible in North Georiga with at least one dose, only the first dose is offered at no cost for those without medical coverage. However, a single dose of hepatitis A vaccine provides a very high percentage of protection for most healthy adults.

 If anyone suspects a case of hepatitis A, please report it to your County Health Department (click on above county name). If reporting after hours, please call 1-866-PUB-HLTH (1-866-782-4584). Persons who may be infected should immediately contact a healthcare provider for evaluation and treatment.

 

Hepatitis A Basic Information from the CDC

 

What is hepatitis?

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. When the liver is inflamed or damaged, its function can be affected. Heavy alcohol use, toxins, some medications, and certain medical conditions can cause hepatitis but a virus often causes hepatitis. In the United States, the most common hepatitis viruses are hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus.

What is hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is a highly contagious liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus. It can range from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe illness lasting several months. Although rare, hepatitis A can cause death in some people. Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food, or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool from an infected person.

What is the difference between hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C?

Hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C are liver infections caused by three different viruses. Although each can cause similar symptoms, they have different modes of transmission and can affect the liver differently. Hepatitis A is usually a short-term infection and does not become chronic. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C can also begin as short-term, acute infections, but in some people, the virus remains in the body, resulting in chronic disease and long-term liver problems. There are vaccines to prevent hepatitis A and hepatitis B; however, there is no vaccine for hepatitis C.

The page What is hepatitis? provides more information about the differences between hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.

How serious is hepatitis A?

Most people who get hepatitis A feel sick for several weeks, but they usually recover completely and do not have lasting liver damage. In rare cases, hepatitis A can cause liver failure and death; this is more common in people older than 50 and in people with other liver diseases.

How common is hepatitis A in the United States?

In 2016, there were an estimated 4,000 hepatitis A cases in the United States. Hepatitis A rates have declined by more than 95% since the hepatitis A vaccine first became available in 1995.

 

Transmission / Exposure

How is hepatitis A spread?Information for Food Service Establishments on Hepatitis A flyer web icon

Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food, or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool from an infected person. Hepatitis A can also spread from close personal contact with an infected person such as through sex or caring for someone who is ill.

Contamination of food (this can include frozen and undercooked food) by hepatitis A can happen at any point: growing, harvesting, processing, handling, and even after cooking. Contamination of food or water is more likely to occur in countries where hepatitis A is common and in areas where there are poor sanitary conditions or poor personal hygiene. In the United States, chlorination of water kills hepatitis A virus that enters the water supply. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) routinely monitors natural bodies of water used for recreation for fecal contamination so there is no need for monitoring for hepatitis A virus specifically.

(Click here or on the graphic at right to view and download the North Georgia Health District's  INFORMATION FOR FOOD SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS ON HEPATITIS A flyer.)

 

Who is at risk for hepatitis A?

 

Although anyone can get hepatitis A, in the United States, certain groups of people are at higher risk, such as:

  • People with direct contact with someone who has hepatitis AWhat North Georgians Should Know About Hepatitis A flyer web
  • Travelers to countries where hepatitis A is common
  • Men who have sexual contact with men
  • People who use drugs, both injection and non-injection drugs
  • Household members or caregivers of a recent adoptee from countries where hepatitis A is common
  • People with clotting factor disorders, such as hemophilia
  • People working with nonhuman primates

I think I have been exposed to hepatitis A. What should I do?

If you have any questions about potential exposure to hepatitis A, call your health professional or your local or state health department. If you were recently exposed to hepatitis A virus and have not been vaccinated against hepatitis A, you might benefit from an injection of either hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin. However, the vaccine or immune globulin are only effective if given within the first 2 weeks after exposure. A health professional can decide what is best based on your age and overall health.

What is postexposure prophylaxis (PEP)?

Postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) refers to trying to prevent or treat a disease after an exposure. For hepatitis A, postexposure prophylaxis is an injection of either hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin. However, the vaccine or immune globulin are only effective in preventing hepatitis A if given within the first 2 weeks after exposure.

If I have had hepatitis A in the past, can I get it again?

No. Once you recover from hepatitis A, you develop antibodies that protect you from the virus for life. An antibody is a substance found in the blood that the body produces in response to a virus. Antibodies protect the body from disease by attaching to the virus and destroying it.

How long does hepatitis A virus survive outside the body?

The hepatitis A virus is able to survive outside the body for months. High temperatures, such as boiling or cooking food or liquids for at least 1 minute at 185°F (85°C), kill the virus, although freezing temperatures do not.

 

Symptoms

What are the symptoms of hepatitis A?

Older children and adults typically have symptoms. If symptoms develop, they can appear abruptly and can include:

  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Dark urine
  • Diarrhea
  • Clay-colored stools
  • Joint pain
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes)

 

Most children younger than age 6 do not have symptoms when they have hepatitis A. When symptoms are present, young children typically do not have jaundice but most older children and adults with hepatitis A have jaundice.

How soon after exposure to hepatitis A will symptoms appear?

If symptoms occur, they usually start appearing 4 weeks after exposure, but can occur as early as 2 and as late as 7 weeks after exposure. Symptoms usually develop over a period of several days.

How long do hepatitis A symptoms last?

Symptoms usually last less than 2 months, although some people (10%–15%) with hepatitis A can have symptoms for as long as 6 months.

Can a person spread hepatitis A without having symptoms?

Yes. Many people, especially children, have no symptoms. In addition, a person can transmit the virus to others up to 2 weeks before symptoms appear.

 

Diagnosis / Treatment

How will I know if I have hepatitis A? How is hepatitis A diagnosed?

A doctor can determine if you have hepatitis A by discussing your symptoms and taking a blood sample.

How is hepatitis A treated?

Unvaccinated people who have been exposed recently (within 2 weeks) to the hepatitis A virus should get the hepatitis A vaccine or a shot of immune globulin to prevent severe illness. To treat the symptoms of hepatitis A, doctors usually recommend rest, adequate nutrition, and fluids. Some people will need medical care in a hospital. It can take a few months before people with hepatitis A begin to feel better.

 

Prevention / Vaccination

Can hepatitis A be prevented?

Yes. The best way to prevent hepatitis A is through vaccination with the hepatitis A vaccine. To get the full benefit of the hepatitis A vaccine, more than one shot is needed. The number and timing of these shots depends on the type of vaccine you are given. Practicing good hand hygiene – including thoroughly washing hands after using the bathroom, changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food – plays an important role in preventing the spread of hepatitis A.

Who should get vaccinated against hepatitis A?

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends hepatitis A vaccination for the following people:

  • All children at age 1 year
  • Travelers to countries where hepatitis A is common
  • Family and caregivers of adoptees from countries where hepatitis A is common
  • Men who have sexual encounters with other men
  • Users of recreational drugs, whether injected or not
  • People with chronic or long-term liver disease, including hepatitis B or hepatitis C
  • People with clotting-factor disorders
  • People with direct contact with others who have hepatitis A
  • Any person wishing to obtain immunity (protection)

The North Georgia Health District is also encouraging food service workers to get vaccinated against hepatitis A.

How is the hepatitis A vaccine given?

The hepatitis A vaccine is safe and effective and given as 2 shots, 6 months apart. Both shots are needed for long-term protection. The hepatitis A vaccine also comes in a combination form, containing both hepatitis A and B vaccine, that can be given to anyone 18 years of age and older. This combination vaccine is given as 3 shots, over 6 months. All three shots are needed for long-term protection for both hepatitis A and B.

Is the hepatitis A vaccine effective?

Yes, the hepatitis A vaccine is highly effective in preventing hepatitis A virus infection. A second hepatitis A shot results in long-term protection.

Is the hepatitis A vaccine safe?

Yes, the hepatitis A vaccine is safe. No serious side effects have been reported from the hepatitis A vaccine. Soreness at the injection site is the most common side effect reported. As with any medicine, there is always a small risk that a serious problem could occur after someone gets the vaccine. However, the potential risks associated with hepatitis A are much greater than the potential risks associated with the hepatitis A vaccine. Since the licensure of the first hepatitis A vaccine in 1995, millions of doses of hepatitis A vaccine have been given in the United States and worldwide.

Who should not receive the hepatitis A vaccine?

People who have ever had a serious allergic reaction to the hepatitis A vaccine or who are known to be allergic to any part of the hepatitis A vaccine should not receive the vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies. Also, the vaccine is not licensed for use in infants under age 1 year.

What is immune globulin (IG)?

Immune globulin (IG) is a substance made from human blood plasma that contains antibodies that protect against infection. Immune globulin is a shot and provides short-term protection against hepatitis A for up to 2 months depending on the dosage given. IG is sometimes used before travel to a country where hepatitis A is common. IG is also used to prevent infection after exposure to the hepatitis A virus but must be given within 2 weeks after exposure for the best protection.

Will the hepatitis A vaccine protect me from other forms of hepatitis?

No, the hepatitis A vaccine will only protect you against hepatitis A. There is a separate vaccine available for hepatitis B. There is also a combination hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine that offers protection for both viruses. There is no vaccine for hepatitis C at this time.

Can hepatitis A vaccine be given to people with compromised immune systems, such as hemodialysis patients or people with AIDS?

Yes. The hepatitis A vaccine is inactivated (not “live”), so it can be given to people with compromised immune systems.

Is it harmful to have an extra dose of hepatitis A vaccine or to repeat the entire hepatitis A vaccine series?

No, getting extra doses of hepatitis A vaccine is not harmful.

What should be done if the last dose of hepatitis A vaccine is delayed?

If the second dose has been delayed (more than 6 months since the first dose was given), the second, or last dose, should be given as soon as possible. The first dose does not need to be given again.

Where can I get the hepatitis A vaccine?

Speak with your health professional or call your local public health department, where free or low-cost vaccines for adults may be offered. For children, check the Vaccines for Children Program.

 

Hepatitis A Vaccine and International Travel

Who should get the hepatitis A vaccine before traveling internationally?

Travel Clinic word boxAnyone who is susceptible (unvaccinated or never had hepatitis A) and planning to travel to countries where hepatitis A is common should be vaccinated with the hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin (IG) before traveling. Even travelers to urban areas, resorts, and luxury hotels in countries where hepatitis A is common are at high risk. Even travelers reporting that they maintained good hand hygiene and were careful about what they drank and ate have been infected when traveling to countries where hepatitis A is common.

How soon before travel should I get the hepatitis A vaccine?

You should get the first dose of hepatitis A vaccine as soon as you plan international travel to a country where hepatitis A is common. Two weeks or more before departure is ideal, but getting the vaccine any time before travel will provide some protection.

For optimal protection, older adults (aged >40 years), people who are immunocompromised, and people with chronic liver disease or other chronic medical conditions who are planning to depart in less than 2 weeks should receive the first dose of vaccine and can get a shot of immune globulin at the same time, (0.1 mL/kg for travel up to 1 month; 0.2 mL/kg for travel up to 2 months; repeat dose of 0.2 mL/kg every two months) at a separate injection site.

I’m leaving for my trip in a few days, can I still get the hepatitis A vaccine?

Experts say that the first dose of hepatitis A vaccine can be given any time before departure. This will provide some protection for most healthy people.

What should I do if I am traveling internationally but cannot receive hepatitis A vaccine?

Travelers who are allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin (IG). Immune globulin provides effective protection against hepatitis A virus infection for up to 2 months, depending on the dosage given. If you are staying longer than two months, you can get another dose of IG for continued protection.

 

CDC Materials

Fact Sheets

Vaccine Information Statement

Other Online Resources

Federal Links

What I need to know about Hepatitis A (simple text) English / Spanish -
National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond -
National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

Georgia Department of Public Health: Hepatitis A - https://dph.georgia.gov/hepatitisA 

HepatitisAFlyer English

             
             
             
             

 

ABOUT US

HIV CLINICS

PrEP CLINIC

Ryan White Program

Living Bridge Center

Why PrEP?

Meet our Staff

Living Bridge Center South

PrEP Services

Contact Information

Clinic Services

Make an Appointment

 

Anyone can get HIV. There is no cure for HIV, but it can be prevented. If you need HIV care, call The Living Bridge Center in Dalton at (706) 281-2360 or The Living Bridge Center South at (470) 836-5700 in Canton. 

 

TLBC Photo 2TLBC SouthNot Knowing is the Risk words

      The Living Bridge Center in Dalton and The Living Bridge Center South in Canton

 

Georgia has the 4th highest rate of HIV infection in the nation. The Living Bridge Center in Dalton and The Living Bridge Center South in Canton are there to help people battling HIV. The Living Bridge Centers offer full-service HIV care and treatment, HIV and STD testing, a PrEP clinic, and education and support to help people remain negative. Visit The Living Bridge Center at 1200 W. Waugh Street in Dalton or The Living Bridge Center South at 130 Riverstone Terrace, Suite 102 in Canton. Or call now to set up an enrollment appointment in Dalton at (706) 281-2360 or (470) 863-5700 in Canton. Click here to get more information about The Living Bridge Centers in North Georgia along with contact details and locations.

 

 Fast Facts concerning HIV

  • 1 in 7 people are unaware of their status.
  • 22% of people aged 13-24 are HIV positive.
  • 39,782 people in the U.S. received an HIV diagnosis in 2016.
  • HIV/AIDS is still the top 10 leading cause of death for those aged 25-44.
  • The south has the highest number of people living with HIV, accounting for 45% of the total HIV/AIDS population in the united states.
  • Globally, there were 36.7 million people living with HIV in 2016 and 1.8 million new cases of HIV during the same year.

 

Faces of HIV words

Group of photos for HIV web page with magnifying glass

WHAT IS PrEP?

prep 101.2PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis - "prophylaxis" means to prevent or control the spread of an infection or disease. PrEP is an HIV prevention option that works by taking one pill every day. PrEP is available at The Living Bridge Center in Dalton (706-281-2360) and The Living Bridge Center South in Canton (470-836-5700)Learn more about PrEP in our brochure by clicking here.

   

 

 More info photo

 

HIV and the SouthHIV Service locator for web

Campaigns for HIV and youth

Understanding transmission

HIV prevention methods

Comprehensive information concerning STD’s and HIV risk

Prevention and risk information concerning pregnant women

Prevention and risk information for Injection drug use

Information concerning HIV testing

Información y prevención del VIH

Georgia surveillance

 

All health departments in the North Georgia Health District provide HIV testing at no charge. This includes Whitfield, Murray, Gilmer, Fannin, Pickens and Cherokee counties. For additional information and driving directions to one of these locations, click on our LOCATIONS tab.

____________________________________

 

Are you a Community Agency who wants to provide HIV Counseling and Testing?

Please call The Living Bridge Center

Whitfield County: 
    1200 W. Waugh St., Suite A, Dalton, GA 30720 - (706) 281-2360

or The Living Bridge Center South

Cherokee County:
     130 Riverstone Terrace, Suite 102, Canton, GA 30114 - (470) 836-5700

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Anyone can get HIV. There is no cure for HIV, but it can be prevented. If you need HIV care, call The Living Bridge Center in Dalton at (706) 281-2360 or The Living Bridge Center South at (470) 863-5700 in Canton. 

 Not Knowing is the Risk words

TLBC Photo 2TLBC South

                      The Living Bridge Center in Dalton and The Living Bridge Center South in Canton

 

Georgia has the 4th highest rate of HIV infection in the nation. The Living Bridge Center in Dalton and The Living Bridge Center South in Canton are there to help people battling HIV. The Living Bridge Centers offer full-service HIV care and treatment, HIV and STD testing, a PrEP clinic, and education and support to help people remain negative. Visit The Living Bridge Center at 1200 W. Waugh Street in Dalton or The Living Bridge Center South at 130 Riverstone Terrace, Suite 102 in Canton. Or call now to set up an enrollment appointment in Dalton at (706) 281-2360 or (470) 863-5700 in Canton. Click here to get more information about The Living Bridge Centers in North Georgia along with contact details and locations.

 

 Fast Facts concerning HIV

  • 1 in 7 people are unaware of their status.
  • 22% of people aged 13-24 are HIV positive.
  • 39,782 people in the U.S. received an HIV diagnosis in 2016.
  • HIV/AIDS is still the top 10 leading cause of death for those aged 25-44.
  • The south has the highest number of people living with HIV, accounting for 45% of the total HIV/AIDS population in the united states.
  • Globally, there were 36.7 million people living with HIV in 2016 and 1.8 million new cases of HIV during the same year.

 

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WHAT IS PrEP?

prep 101.2PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis - "prophylaxis" means to prevent or control the spread of an infection or disease. PrEP is an HIV prevention option that works by taking one pill every day. PrEP is available at The Living Bridge Center in Dalton (706-281-2360) and The Living Bridge Center South in Canton (470-863-5700)Learn more about PrEP in our brochure by clicking here.

   

 

 

 

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Free Mail Order Condoms Now Available to North Georgians 

Tap & Scan the Code at right to access the online order form or go to this link here on our website: bit.ly/FreeMailOrderCondoms-NorthGA

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HIV and the SouthHIV Service locator for web

Campaigns for HIV and youth

Understanding transmission

HIV prevention methods

Comprehensive information concerning STD’s and HIV risk

Prevention and risk information concerning pregnant women

Prevention and risk information for Injection drug use

Information concerning HIV testing

Información y prevención del VIH

Georgia surveillance

All health departments in the North Georgia Health District provide HIV testing at no charge. This includes Whitfield, Murray, Gilmer, Fannin, Pickens and Cherokee counties. For additional information and driving directions to one of these locations, click on our LOCATIONS tab.

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Are you a Community Agency who wants to provide HIV Counseling and Testing?

Please call The Living Bridge Center

Whitfield County: 
    1200 W. Waugh St., Suite A, Dalton, GA 30720 - (706) 281-2360

or The Living Bridge Center South

Cherokee County:
     130 Riverstone Terrace, Suite 102, Canton, GA 30114 - (470) 863-5700

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